Decemburger III

DUST, Terrapin Care Station, Atlas Cabinets, & Ritual of Sin Present

Decemburger III

UADA, Axeslasher, Crypt Trip, Glacial Tomb, Bummer, The Ditch And The Delta

Sat, December 15, 2018

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$25.00 - $35.00

This event is 21 and over

Decemburger III
Decemburger III
Denver's annual winter clash of heavy metal and competitive eating at the Hi-Dive!

Eating Contest Rules:
First to finish their plate of sliders wins
Water and cups are provided
Vomiting = disqualification
Interfering with another contestant = disqualification

1st Place Prizes:
$100 cash
Decemburger Trophy
Decemburger III poster
Dust Presents merch package
Ritual of Sin Magazine package
All the Greasy Glory

2nd Place Prize:
Decemburger III poster
Dust Presents merch package
Ritual of Sin Magazine package
UADA
UADA
From the darkness, UADA (meaning haunted in latin) emerges breathing the spirit of the original 90’s Black Metal wave. Since 2014, this Portland, Oregon four-piece has used a unique approach to combine raw black metal and spectral melodies.

January 24th, 2015 saw the live debut appearance for a packed house at ‘Famine Fest II in Portland, alongside bands like Terrorizer, Engorged, Nekrofilth, Drawn & Quartered, Cemetery Lust & many more. Uada was well received & quickly dubbed one of the main highlights of the Festival. Following their first and only photo shoot with Peter Beste, Uada returned fire in Portland at the 6th Northwestern Black Circle Festival with Inquisition, Demoncy, Weregoat, Slutvomit & many more. This first year included 10 additional showings in the Pacific Northwest with Antaeus, Negura Bunget, Bell Witch, Christian Mistress, Sabbath Assembly, and more.

In spring 2016, their debut album “Devoid of Light” will be released via Eisenwald, self-recorded by the band & then mastered by Joel Grind (Toxic Holocaust). It features the artwork of Kris Verwimp and band photography by Peter Beste. In support of this new album, Uada is confirmed to play the Northwestern Black Circle Festival again, this time with Absu and will mark the kick off date for a west coast tour.

“Uada is one of the most interesting & exciting bands coming out of Portland these days” – John Haughm (Agalloch)
Axeslasher
Axeslasher
Worship Satan and listen to AXESLASHER.
Crypt Trip
Crypt Trip
We play rock n' roll.
Glacial Tomb
Glacial Tomb
GLACIAL TOMB is a three piece blackened death outfit from Denver, CO featuring current and former members of Khemmis, Abigail Williams, and Cult of the Lost Cause. Their caustic blend of death, grind, sludge, and black metal draws on influences such as His Hero is Gone, Dragged into Sunlight, Deathspell Omega, Trap Them, and Gorguts.
Bummer
Bummer
"I just want to scare you, honestly," Matt Perrin says between mouthfuls of food. "When I get up onstage, the whole point of what I want to do is scare people. I want people to look at me and get uncomfortable. I mean, look at me."

Perrin is wearing black, square-frame glasses; a T-shirt printed with grazing cows; and a lime-green baseball cap turned backward over his long, dishwater-blond hair. When he narrows his sharp brown eyes, the 19-year-old guitarist and lead singer for Olathe thrash-rock trio Bummer appears altogether unthreatening. He knows this.

His bandmates know, too. Huddled around a table with Perrin at Grinders, bassist Mike Gustafson, 22, and drummer Tom Williams, 18, are about as unassuming as the basket of fries they're sharing. And yet, since the release of Bummer's four-song Milk EP last October, word of this up-and-coming band's brutal, barbaric sound has spread.

"I feel like people look at us and are like, 'Oh, what's going to happen here?' " Perrin continues. "And if someone's never heard of us before, I want them to be genuinely scared the first time they hear us. Because Mike's just ripping, and Tom's just loud as fuck."

"We turn all our stuff up as loud as it goes and we just fly," Gustafson says. "We didn't try to make it sound so angry. That's just how it came out. I just like super-loud, super-catchy stuff — stuff with hooks that hit hard."

Perrin adds, "We all kind of get it when it comes to that. It's gotta be heavy and catchy, but it has to punch you in the face at the same time."

Milk does come out swinging, and over its swift quarter-hour, the fuming and the venom don't let up. It's the work of a tight unit. Musical sympathies and ambitions are firmly aligned. Perrin and Williams have been friends since high school, and they were dedicated fans of Gustafson's now-defunct band the Resourceful Horse.

"The reason I started playing with them, even though I'm not much older, was because everyone my age was getting way too trashed to play," Gustafson says. "And, of course, that's fun and stuff, but these guys are motivated, and it was nice to play with people who gave a shit. We've all been in different bands, and this is just easy."

Not everything is about pure sonic assault, though. Perrin, who has roots in jazz guitar and doesn't play down his love of J-pop, has enrolled in jazz courses this fall at Kansas City, Kansas, Community College.

"I've been playing jazz since eighth grade," Perrin says. "I've taken a bunch of music-theory classes. I understand scales and keys. It works for us in that Mike is very feel, and I take his feel and I dissect it."

"I taught myself," Gustafson explains. "Usually it takes them a second to figure out what I'm doing because they're like, 'What key is that in?' And they're trying to figure out time signatures and stuff. And I'm just like, 'Just go with it.' I'm a terrible influence."

Another EP is in the works, and for the first time, Bummer is headed to a professional recording space (Weston House Recording). Another first: actual vinyl. But like Milk, the next EP — set for a fall release — will include just four songs. The reasoning?

"We're poor," Gustafson says. His companions give despondent nods.

"But this is the last EP," Williams says. "We thought it'd be cool to do at least one EP that gets physically put out, and then do a full-length after and put it out on vinyl — you know, if the EP goes well on vinyl."

Still, don't expect the LP, which might see a release next winter, to overcompensate with lengthy material. For the most part, Bummer's songs run less than four minutes, and the live shows rarely push past 25.

"There's a lot of bands that play for 30 or 45 minutes, and I'm standing there like, 'Dude, I actually want to leave now,' " Gustafson says. "We usually do a 15- to 20-minute set. We try to get in there, play loud and leave."

"There's an article called 'Six Reasons Your Band Shouldn't Play Longer Than 20 Minutes' [by Drew Ailes, of The Village Voice], and everyone should read it," Perrin says. "If you play more than 20 minutes, you over-satisfy. You want to leave the audience with just enough, and if they dig it, they dig it. If they want you to play more, that sucks. I guess they have to come see you again. That's how it's always been with us."
The Ditch And The Delta
The Ditch And The Delta
The devil is in the details with The Ditch. The expanded harmony and tension, as well as the unique rhythms are, in part, due to Secrist’s studies and degree in Jazz Composition. The band calls their brand of sludgy/noise/doom, “Big Riff”. Employing different tunings, and modal centers, every song The Ditch writes manages to avoid many of the usual doom trappings of excessive feedback, static harmony, and pentatonic riffs. The Lyrical content deals with everyday life and the constant suppression and alienation that comes with it. Three men from Mormon dominated Utah are bound to have a lot of resentment and disdain for the mono culture they exist in day to day.
Venue Information:
Hi-Dive
7 S. Broadway
Denver, CO, 80209
http://www.hi-dive.com/