Whores

Whores

Wrong, Bummer

Mon, May 29, 2017

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12.00 - $15.00

This event is 21 and over

Whores
Whores
Formed in 2010, Atlanta, Ga. noise merchants, WHORES., have quickly become infamous, thanks to their crushing live shows and no-holds-barred punk rock attitude.

The band signed to Brutal Panda Records in 2011 to unleash their ferocious debut, “RUINER.” Recorded at The Factory in Atlanta, “RUINER.” features five crushingly heavy tracks of pissed-off noise rock for fans of Helmet, Pissed Jeans, Harvey Milk and The Jesus Lizard.

Since their inception, the band has toured throughout the U.S., playing shows with Red Fang, Torche, Iron Reagan, Deafheaven, Black Tusk, Floor, Retox, Kylesa, The Atlas Moth, Zozobra, Royal Thunder, Fight Amp, Lo Pan, Coliseum, Obliterations and many others.

In late 2013, WHORES. released their highly anticipated follow-up, “CLEAN.” Recorded by Ryan Boesch (Helmet, Tomahawk, Fu Manchu, Melvins), the record sold out within a month, prompting the band to quickly release a second pressing. “CLEAN.” is now on its fifth pressing.

The band has garnered much attention as one of the best new acts in the noise rock scene. Spin Magazine voted WHORES. as one of the “must-see” bands at the 2014 SXSW and named “CLEAN.” in the top 10 of their 20 Best Metal Albums of 2013.

We were in other bands. Now we're in this band. Soon we will all be deaf. Commercially moribund, second wave, first class, good times, bad vibes.


"Bearing witness to a WHORES show is like being crushed under the tread of a Panzer tank as it charges into battle." -Creative Loafing Atlanta, Critics Pick: Best of Atlanta


"But then, the metallic noise-rock of Atlanta's Whores slashed me gloriously to ribbons. Theirs is a sound that's massive as a barge but furiously athletic. Why they're not mentioned as often or as widely as their heavy Georgian brethren is a mystery. " -This Little Underground, Orlando Weekly


"Next to the stage was Whores, who—I’ll just come out and say it—are the best band in Atlanta right now. Don’t argue with me; just accept it. The trio’s mix of ferocious power, jaw-dropping technical precision, and rhythmic melodicism is just too ferocious, too talented, too goddamn awesome to be denied...It’s breathtaking just how loud and epically primal these guys are." -Latest Disgrace



" Whores is relentless and merciless in its sonic attack: Its gigantic walls of fuzz and thunderously colossal low-end rumble recall The Melvins’ refined sludge; the epic, primal howls, feedback-heavy rests and meticulous precision recall the best of The Jesus Lizard and Karp. Simply: Whores f#!king slays. Period." -Free Times, Columbia's Free Weekly



"To put it plainly, Whores' debut EP, Ruiner, finds the Atlanta noise-rock trio destroying everything in sight with a pulverizing rumble of slow rhythm and hatred. Singer/guitarist Christian Lembach's possessed vocalizations sway between soaring melodies and screaming lashings in "Daddy's Money." The song pulls back the hammer and a blast of methodical, teeth-gnashing rage ensues without an ounce of subtlety heard anywhere throughout the four remaining songs. But there is a tuneful drive behind standout cuts "Fake Life" and "Straight Down." Each one moves with brute force, drawing strength from its own ferocity as the bass-heavy rhythms reveal themselves as the vicious centerpiece. The production is clean, direct and loud, facilitating the strengths on "Fake Life." Each song punches with reactionary, and ultimately rewarding, fits of pure psychosis. (4 out of 5 stars)" -Creative Loafing Atlanta



"Of all the truly awe-inspiring heaviness coming out of Georgia right now, Whores is still criminally underrated outside their region and easily stand among the crop’s nastiest cream."-This Little Underground, Orlando Weekly


"On any given night, Christian Lembach suffers anywhere between two and seven brain aneurysms; there's about a 35% chance that Travis Owen's drumsticks formerly played the roles of his tibiae; Jake Shultz's bass amp has caused clinical deafness in at least two dozen people. While none of the preceding statements are based whatsoever in fact, a listen or two through Ruiner just might get you wondering. The five-track debut EP from Whores. displays the trio's uncanny ability to put their angst, anguish, and general discontent into an audial form best described as a septum-bashing, and to do so without any gimmicks, frills, or blood-stained death-masks.

To put it one way, Lembach's unbridled songwriting very accurately reflects the fact that living amongst some of today's less than grateful, self-centered scumbags is often akin to brushing one's teeth with sandpaper. Ruiner is the barbed-wire floss to counteract that; it is the means by which these three southern noise-rockers bite back against the world's shitty ways and its shittier inhabitants. Opener 'Daddy's Money' recapitulates the story of that certain vapid, over-privileged bitch that everyone seems to know, whose father's rent checks just happen to go right up her button nose instead. Or take a track like 'Tell Me Something Scientific,' whose production and execution are as raw as its anti-religious-fundantalist message is obvious. Even the fact that the track's central riff and melody resembles those of the intro to 'Fake Life' just a little too closely is so easily forgivable considering the group's incredible propensity to grind their message home - in a nice way, if that's at all conceivable. Despite its noise-rock roots, nothing about Ruiner comes off as inaccessible: its unrelenting noisiness carries as much purpose and direction as its songwriting, meanwhile maintaining enough of their "***-off" attitude to lend the album its cutthroat allure. It vividly recalls and rehashes all of punk-rock's most essential mantras and motifs whilst supplementing them with some seriously pulverizing neo-monolithic riffage, cementing Ruiner as an end-of-the-year record worth delving back into a now retired 2011 for." - Sputnik Music
Wrong
Wrong
Miami, FL noise rock quartet WRONG formed in 2014 from the ashes of Capsule and released their debut EP Stop Giving last October via Robotic Empire. Featuring former members of Torche and Kylesa amongst their ranks, WRONG play Helmet / Unsane inspired heavy noise rock and were described by Noisey as an "outfit with impeccable credentials and a firm handle on the art of the bludgeoning groove" and by PunkNews as "very promising indeed".

WRONG signed with Relapse Records in the summer of 2015 after making waves on their first North American tour with Torche and Nothing. The band will spend the rest of 2015 touring with House of Lightning and will put the finishing touches on their debut full-length at PineCrust studios in Gainesville, FL this August. The debut will see an early 2016 release while the band will continue to bring their relentless live show to a neighborhood near you for years to come.
Bummer
Bummer
"I just want to scare you, honestly," Matt Perrin says between mouthfuls of food. "When I get up onstage, the whole point of what I want to do is scare people. I want people to look at me and get uncomfortable. I mean, look at me."

Perrin is wearing black, square-frame glasses; a T-shirt printed with grazing cows; and a lime-green baseball cap turned backward over his long, dishwater-blond hair. When he narrows his sharp brown eyes, the 19-year-old guitarist and lead singer for Olathe thrash-rock trio Bummer appears altogether unthreatening. He knows this.

His bandmates know, too. Huddled around a table with Perrin at Grinders, bassist Mike Gustafson, 22, and drummer Tom Williams, 18, are about as unassuming as the basket of fries they're sharing. And yet, since the release of Bummer's four-song Milk EP last October, word of this up-and-coming band's brutal, barbaric sound has spread.

"I feel like people look at us and are like, 'Oh, what's going to happen here?' " Perrin continues. "And if someone's never heard of us before, I want them to be genuinely scared the first time they hear us. Because Mike's just ripping, and Tom's just loud as fuck."

"We turn all our stuff up as loud as it goes and we just fly," Gustafson says. "We didn't try to make it sound so angry. That's just how it came out. I just like super-loud, super-catchy stuff — stuff with hooks that hit hard."

Perrin adds, "We all kind of get it when it comes to that. It's gotta be heavy and catchy, but it has to punch you in the face at the same time."

Milk does come out swinging, and over its swift quarter-hour, the fuming and the venom don't let up. It's the work of a tight unit. Musical sympathies and ambitions are firmly aligned. Perrin and Williams have been friends since high school, and they were dedicated fans of Gustafson's now-defunct band the Resourceful Horse.

"The reason I started playing with them, even though I'm not much older, was because everyone my age was getting way too trashed to play," Gustafson says. "And, of course, that's fun and stuff, but these guys are motivated, and it was nice to play with people who gave a shit. We've all been in different bands, and this is just easy."

Not everything is about pure sonic assault, though. Perrin, who has roots in jazz guitar and doesn't play down his love of J-pop, has enrolled in jazz courses this fall at Kansas City, Kansas, Community College.

"I've been playing jazz since eighth grade," Perrin says. "I've taken a bunch of music-theory classes. I understand scales and keys. It works for us in that Mike is very feel, and I take his feel and I dissect it."

"I taught myself," Gustafson explains. "Usually it takes them a second to figure out what I'm doing because they're like, 'What key is that in?' And they're trying to figure out time signatures and stuff. And I'm just like, 'Just go with it.' I'm a terrible influence."

Another EP is in the works, and for the first time, Bummer is headed to a professional recording space (Weston House Recording). Another first: actual vinyl. But like Milk, the next EP — set for a fall release — will include just four songs. The reasoning?

"We're poor," Gustafson says. His companions give despondent nods.

"But this is the last EP," Williams says. "We thought it'd be cool to do at least one EP that gets physically put out, and then do a full-length after and put it out on vinyl — you know, if the EP goes well on vinyl."

Still, don't expect the LP, which might see a release next winter, to overcompensate with lengthy material. For the most part, Bummer's songs run less than four minutes, and the live shows rarely push past 25.

"There's a lot of bands that play for 30 or 45 minutes, and I'm standing there like, 'Dude, I actually want to leave now,' " Gustafson says. "We usually do a 15- to 20-minute set. We try to get in there, play loud and leave."

"There's an article called 'Six Reasons Your Band Shouldn't Play Longer Than 20 Minutes' [by Drew Ailes, of The Village Voice], and everyone should read it," Perrin says. "If you play more than 20 minutes, you over-satisfy. You want to leave the audience with just enough, and if they dig it, they dig it. If they want you to play more, that sucks. I guess they have to come see you again. That's how it's always been with us."
Venue Information:
Hi-Dive
7 S. Broadway
Denver, CO, 80209
http://www.hi-dive.com/