Hand Habits

KGNU Presents

Hand Habits

Mega Bog, Shana Falana

Wed, March 22, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

$10.00 - $12.00

Off Sale

This event is 18 and over

Hand Habits
Hand Habits
Meg Duffy hasn't stopped moving, working, or growing since she left her quiet childhood home in upstate New York. You can find her in the back of the van reading a book, quietly warming up backstage with some guitar workouts, or waiting tables at a neighborhood pizzeria. Though Meg didn't pick up the instrument until she was seventeen years old, her intuitive, naturalistic musicality and commitment to the craft of guitar playing have made an in demand collaborator and guitarist for countless indie acts (Kevin Morby, Mega Bog, Weyes Blood) and kept her between the road and the studio for almost three straight years. Like much of the richest art, Meg's LP debut Wildy Idle (Humble Before the Void) (Woodsist 2017) ​is many things at once. The record is a collection of songs written amidst the constant motion of touring, recording, and working part-time jobs; recorded at home in North East LA between other commitments, around the sounds of roommates cooking breakfast, and dogs pattering though an old craftsman house. Layered with Duffy's signature extended guitar techniques, poems read by friends, and musical contributions from contemporaries like Keven Lareau (Quilt), Avi Buffalo, Sheridan Riley, and others, the album combines striking visual storytelling and compelling melody with a deceptively light touch. Drawing on diverse influences ranging from novelist Iris Murdoch to Phil Elverum's seminal work under his Microphones moniker, this album is more than the sum of its parts. Like a folded paper fortune teller, each listen reveals a new, hidden truth about living, working, and falling in and out of love buried in the quietly beating heart of the record. Dark, pulsing tracks like the intoxicating "Bad Boy" sit comfortably beside sunny strummers like "All The While" with its bouncing bass line and beguiling lyrics. The thread that runs through all these songs is Duffy's voice, in turns languid and sweet, and always telling a story. Mixed and mastered by contemporary electronic music maestro M. Geddes Gengras, the result is an LP as hypnotic as Hand Habit's impossibly immersive live set, and filled with the same engaging blend of wild improvisation and perfect restraint. Expansive, atmospheric arrangements punctuated with intricate melodic details. This record is indoor music at its finest: listen in the morning, in bed with your partner, in the kitchen while you make coffee, at night when you read on the porch.
Mega Bog
Mega Bog
Mega Bog is the moniker of song-dribbler Erin Birgy, a Pacific Northwest rodeo child with an unmistakable laugh who was allegedly cursed upon conception. Over the past 8 years the band has stretched and wandered in a crescendo towards musical freedom. Now based in New York City, Birgy has adopted a band of wiggly jazz cartoons lifted from bands like Big Thief, iji, Big Eater, Causings, Hand Habits, Heatwarmer and others.

Melodies always lush, erotic and free. Chords always dissonant, abstract and evolutionary. On their 2013 album Gone Banana, Bog settled into their homemade cloud of pop and jazz. Spreading the discs around the world over countless tours of dim zones. On their new bug, Happy Together, Mega Bog leapfrogs further into the storm. Dizzying fusion of lounge, pop and bouncing rocks under poetic tantrums of love gone all the way wrong. Listen closer.

Mega Bog is the ever-evolving moniker of song-dribbler Erin Birgy, a Pacific Northwest rodeo child with an unmistakable laugh who was allegedly cursed upon conception. Birgy often collaborates with a few Northwest jazzy power-trolls to create loving sound for evil poems, most frequently Zach Burba (songwriter of pop group iji and author of this bio). Melodies always lush, erotic and free. Chords always dissonant, abstract and evolutionary. If no one ever asked for a band like Mega Bog, it's because they didn't know they should.
Shana Falana
Shana Falana
“Dark pop,” Shana Falana calls it, when pressed for a genre. On Here Comes the Wave, the veteran of the Brooklyn and San Francisco undergrounds deals in paradoxes and oppositions: drones stormy and serene, layers of warmth streaked with wildness and troubled riffs, ethereal forces at war and at play. The duality runs deep in the record’s unlikely birth story as well.

In the winter of 2006, Shana lost half of her index finger in a workplace elevator accident in New York City. On the passenger seat of her car that morning—when the shoegaze/psychedelic songwriter was pulled over (and let go) with expired California plates and no insurance—sat cassette tapes of Django Reinhardt and Jerry Garcia, two guitarists famous for adapting to missing or damaged fingers in the pursuit of their art.

Themes of synchronicity, and gain born from loss, recur throughout the story and the record. Shana grappled with addiction and wrote furiously following the accident and this burst of driven productivity, a decade later, accounts for half of the potent, transformational songs on Here Comes the Wave. “Somehow, I knew those songs would serve me well later,” says the long-sober and creatively disciplined Shana Falana. The emotional turmoil of addiction seethes through the unstable sludge and fuzz of “Lie 2 Me,” but in the light and buoyant psychedelia of “Cloudbeats,” Shana hears the call of her own recovery, several years before it actually began.

Luminous, wise, and empathetic new songs comprise the other half of Here Comes the Wave, forming a dialogue between selves across a great expanse of time and personal transformation. On the single, “Cool Kids” she delivers an ethereal message of acceptance to her younger self and to all young people disfigured by social pressures, driven to addiction, marginalized by gender and racial identities. On the record’s cover, a polaroid self-portrait Falana took long before “selfie” was a word is artfully streaked and defaced by artist Carla Rozman.

Here Comes the Wave is Shana Falana’s second collaboration in as many years with producer D. James Goodwin (Bob Weir, Whitney, Kevin Morby) and long-time partner and drummer Mike Amari, both of whom play a larger role here than on 2015’s Set Your Lightning Fire Free. As is their way, Shana and friends trusted the material and their process, recording and arranging quickly, layering generously, going for audacious sounds and heightened moments. They had reason to be bold going into this record; the last one had been featured in the television series American Horror Story and generously affirmed by Pitchfork, Village Voice, Stereogum and others.

Themes of maturity and closure abound: letting go of youth (and eulogizing her native San Fransciso’s D.I.Y scene in the exquisite “Castle Kids”); coming to terms with the death of her father and of a musical hero and father figure in Lou Reed, whose song “Ocean” closes the record with a gradual wash of clarity, acceptance and affirmation.

Here Comes the Wave will be released on October 21, 2016 on Team Love Records.
Venue Information:
Hi-Dive
7 S. Broadway
Denver, CO, 80209
http://www.hi-dive.com/